engineuring

Posts Tagged ‘neuroprostheses

A few weeks ago I’ve been interviewed for H+ Magazine on my project of re-engineering human consciousness with new technologies such as brain-machine interfaces, and I attach the most interesting points from the interview here. Shortly about the project: ¬†to develop such brain-machine interface that will enable us to actually feel what is going on inside the machine, and even become aware of what is going on inside the minds of other connected people. It turns out, however, that there is much more usefulness into this project than just the potential to spy into others’ minds (don’t take me wrong – it can actually help us understand each other better!) – there is also potential for increase in our lifespan up to the immortality, and for increase in our level of spiritual freedom. If you’re interested how – read points #06 and #07. There is also discussion of the most relevant research that will provide a decent base for implementing the project – #02 and #08, and lot of other interesting stuff ūüôā

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Here the poster I presented at the¬†Toward a Science of Consciousness 2010 conference. I propose a new approach for building sensory prostheses. Neuroprostheses that are developed today evoke sensory experiences by stimulating the brain. Brain produces visual, tactile or auditory experiences in response to stimulation. In proposed model, experiences are not generated by brain – they are produced by electronic device that is capable of conscious experiences – “qualia” – by itself. The conscious experiences of this device and biological brain are then merged through special kind of brain-machine interface.

Motor prostheses and intelligence augmentation are mentioned too ūüėČ

Consciousness in mixed systems: merging artificial and biological minds via Brain-Machine Interface

Poster abstract:

The rapidly developing field of Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) technology seeks to establish a direct communication-and-control channel between human brain and machines. Practical applications for BMI include restoration of lost vision and motor functions, and even extending normal human capabilities. But unfortunately current BMI systems are far too poor to achieve even a level of performance that is comparable to what humans are normally capable of, let alone improving it. And this situation holds on for quite a while. The possible solution for coming out is to move research focus to those aspects of brain-machine interaction that usually do not receive much attention.

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